Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Lobster!

We are spoiled here on the coast of Maine. Lobster is always available and is fresh from a local lobster pound often right off the boat. No matter where you buy your lobster make sure they are fresh and lively and not lethargic. They should flap their tails when picked up out of the water.  

When you think of cooking lobsters, most think of a big pot of boiling water, when in reality steaming your lobsters (instead of boiling) results in a are more flavorful lobster, as well as takes less time to cook. All you need to do is fill a large pot with 2-inches of water and bring to a boil. Place the lobsters in backside down; this will trap the delicious juices in the shell. Cover and steam until bright red about 12 minutes for a 1-pounder and 20 minutes for a 2-pounder. To test if they are done, simply pull off one of the small legs. If it comes off easily it is done.


A 1 ½ pound lobster will yield about ½-pound or about 1 ½ cups lobster meat (less if it is a shedder). 
Keep it simple when it comes to serving lobster. There is no need for fancy sauces or stuffing. The meat is delicious on its own and most enjoy it dipped in a little melted butter.


 




A few fun facts about lobsters

  • Lobsters, like all crustaceans, molt when they outgrow their shells.  Typically this happens around mid-summer which is when you can find shedders. A tasty sweet tender treat, they are less expensive, but also have less meat. And although the hard shell lobsters often provide more meat, it does tend to be a little tougher.
  • Interested in knowing whether the lobster is a female or male? Look on the underside at the base of the tail. There will be two feelers. If the feelers are hard it is a male and if they are feathery it is a female.
  • A one pound lobster is typically about 5-7 years old

Enjoy the sweet, sweet taste of lobster!

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